International Dark-Sky Association – Visibility, Environmental, and Astronomical Issues Associated with Blue-Rich White Outdoor Lighting

2010 study

International Dark-Sky Association

Abstract
Outdoor lighting is undergoing a substantial change toward increased use of white lighting sources, accelerated most recently by developments in solid-state lighting. Though the perceived advantages of this shift (better color rendition, increased “visual effectiveness” and efficiency, decreased overall costs, better market acceptance) are commonly touted, there has been little discussion of documented or potential environmental impacts arising from the change in spectral energy distribution of such light sources as compared to the high-pressure sodium technology currently used for most area lighting. This paper summarizes atmospheric, visual, health, and environmental research into spectral effects of lighting at night. The physics describing the interaction of light with the atmosphere is long-established science and shows that the increased blue light emission from white lighting sources will increase visible sky glow and detrimental effects on astronomical research through increased scotopic sensitivity and scattering.
Though other fields of study are less mature, there is nonetheless strong evidence for additional potential negative impacts. Vision science, much of it the same research being used to promote the switch to white light sources, shows that such lighting also increases the likelihood of glare and interferes with the ability of the eye to adapt to low light levels a particular concern for older people. Most of the research evidence concerning adverse
effects of lighting on human health concerns circadian rhythm disruptions and breast cancer. The blue portion of the spectrum is known to interfere most strongly with the human endocrine system mediated by photoperiod, leading to reduction in the production of melatonin, a hormone shown to suppress breast cancer growth and development. A direct connection has not yet been made to outdoor lighting, nor particularly to incidental
exposure (such as through bedroom windows) or the blue component of outdoor lighting, but the potential link is clearly delineated. Concerning effects on other living species, little research has examined spectral issues; yet where spectral issues have been examined, the blue component is more commonly indicated to have particular impacts than other colors (e.g., on sea turtles and insects). Much more research is needed before
firm conclusions can be drawn in many areas, but the evidence is strong enough to suggest a cautious approach and further research before a widespread change to white lighting gets underway.


The entire study can be found at this link.